book review · books · dedication · diversity · Family · Historical fiction · reading · secrets · World War 2

The Song of the Jade Lily by Kirsty Manning {Review}

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Blurb:

1939 Two young girls meet in Shanghai, also known as the “Paris of the East.” Beautiful local Li and Jewish refugee Romy form a fierce friendship, but the deepening shadows of World War II fall over the women as they slip between the city’s glamorous French Concession district and the teeming streets of the Shanghai Ghetto. Yet soon the realities of war prove to be too much for these close friends as they are torn apart.

2016: Fleeing London with a broken heart, Alexandra returns to Australia to be with her grandparents, Romy and Wilhelm. Her grandfather is dying, and over the coming weeks Romy and Wilhelm begin to reveal the family mysteries they have kept secret for more than half a century. As fragments of her mother’s history finally become clear, Alexandra struggles with what she learns while more is also revealed about her grandmother’s own past in Shanghai.

After Wilhelm dies, Alexandra flies to Shanghai, determined to trace her grandparents’ past. Peeling back the layers of their hidden lives, she is forced to question what she knows about her family–and herself.

The Song of the Jade Lily is a lush, provocative, and beautiful story of friendship, motherhood, the price of love, and the power of hardship and courage that can shape us all.

Review:

I knew I was going to like this book, I just was not prepared with how much I was going to love it. Being historical fiction, having a dual timeline, and the presence family secrets were all things that attracted me to this story.

My heart was shattered at the beginning of the story with an event that the Bernfeld family experiences as they attempting to flee Austria for their safety. Their family is torn apart in an instant. I couldn’t fathom going thru that experience and still having the strength to continue. They try to keep themselves together and hold on to their hope and faith as they start a new life in Shanghai. They aren’t the only ones who experience a tragic event while trying to get to safety, young Nina loses the people closest to her.

When Romy meets Li, she is shown a whole new part of Shanghai that she may not have otherwise experienced. The descriptions of the foods that she eats is phenomenal. Both girls are full of life and have such wonderful aspirations even with all that is transpiring around them.

Determination, self sacrifice and the will to fight on are all things Romy, Nina, and Li must deal with as they all get older.  Each of the girls is forced to make decisions in order to survive and protect the ones they love.

Meanwhile in present time, Alexander is dealing with a bad break up and then the death of her beloved grandfather. After his death,  Alexander has questions about her family origin. She knows that her birth mother was adopted and she is wanting to know who her mother may have been. That’s when the secrets start surfacing. After her grandmother’s avoidance of the conversation about her mother, Alexander makes the choice to look into her biological history on her own to try to tie up some loose ends.

As the story progresses thru both timelines, you are met with the feeling of hope for all the characters. You also experience the heartbreak they are forced to encounter.

Kirsty Manning weaves such a beautiful story that makes you feel so many emotions. You experience these emotions when you least expect to. At the same time you are trying to solve the mystery of Alexander’s mother’s birth mother. Along the way she is having to deal with some personal issues of her own.

The love between the characters in the story is so heartwarming and heartbreaking at the same time.  I could gush about this book forever.

Rating:

5 Stars

Availability:

Available now in hardcover, ebook, and audio

A special thank you to William Morrow for my copy in exchange for an honest review.

 

 

book review · books · dedication · diversity · Family · own voices review · reading · secrets

Around Harvard Square by CJ Farley {Review}

Blurb:

It’s the nineties, and Tosh Livingston, straight-A student and superstar athlete, is living the dream—he’s made it out of upstate New York and into the incoming freshman class at Harvard University. But after an accident blows up his basketball-playing hopes, he discovers a new purpose in life—to win the frenzied competition for a spot on the staff of the Harvard Harpoon, the school’s legendary humor magazine.

Along with Lao, his pot-smoking roommate from China, their friend Meera, a passive-aggressive science major from India, and Zippa, a Jamaican student-activist with a flair for cartooning, Tosh finds that becoming a member of the Harpoonis weirder and more dangerous than anyone could have imagined. Success requires pushing themselves to their limits and unearthing long-buried secrets that will rock their school and change all of their lives forever.

Review:

This was one of those books I went into partially unaware of what it was going to be about and I also had some of the plot mixed up with another book, lol. Even with all that I ended up enjoying this story.  There were so many relatable aspects and scenarios. Farley explores privilege and race in a way that is not subtle but also not in your face. There were events that happened with Tosh that I have not only experienced in similar fashion but also have been witness to. He is a black male who is a first generation college student even though his father took a few classes at a community college. He is not your typical star athlete who has gotten in an ivy league school because of his sports talent but because of his intellectual ability.  He has to fight stereotypes while also having to manage not stereotyping others. For example, his roommate Lao and their friend Meera. Each of them has a background that they all try to hide from each other. They are all using Harvard as a clean slate to reinvent themselves.

When an opportunity comes to become part of the Harpoon, one of the school’s long-standing publications they are each tested in their morale and in their friendship.

The story is told from Tosh’s point of view to an unnamed person who you find out later is Zippa and that she plays a much bigger part in the story than is realized. This person has even more at stake than the others and much more to prove.

Farley not only explores the topics of racism, he also explores sexism as well. This story takes place in the 90s but it is so similar to what is currently going on today.

There is not a clear-cut ending to this novel and it basically leaves you to your own thoughts and assumptions as to what happens. I find that although that is not a desirable ending for most, it fit this story perfectly.

Rating:

4 Stars

Availability:

Available now in paperback and ebook

 

Thank you to Akashic Books for my free copy in exchange for an honest review.

AIDs · book review · books · diversity · Family · LGBTQ · reading

The Great Believers by Rebecca Makkai {Review}

Blurb:

A dazzling new novel of friendship and redemption in the face of tragedy and loss set in 1980s Chicago and contemporary Paris, by the acclaimed and award-winning author Rebecca Makkai.

In 1985, Yale Tishman, the development director for an art gallery in Chicago, is about to pull off an amazing coup, bringing in an extraordinary collection of 1920s paintings as a gift to the gallery. Yet as his career begins to flourish, the carnage of the AIDS epidemic grows around him. One by one, his friends are dying and after his friend Nico’s funeral, the virus circles closer and closer to Yale himself. Soon the only person he has left is Fiona, Nico’s little sister.

Thirty years later, Fiona is in Paris tracking down her estranged daughter who disappeared into a cult. While staying with an old friend, a famous photographer who documented the Chicago crisis, she finds herself finally grappling with the devastating ways AIDS affected her life and her relationship with her daughter. The two intertwining stories take us through the heartbreak of the eighties and the chaos of the modern world, as both Yale and Fiona struggle to find goodness in the midst of disaster.

Review:

I’ve had this book on my TBR since it came out last year and finally read it this month with a buddy read group on Instagram.

This story focuses on 2 separate timelines. One being the mid 80s during the beginning of the AIDs epidemic and told from Yale’s point of view and the other being present day and told from Fiona’s point of view. Makkai weaves back and forth between the two storylines seamlessly. Manipulating your emotions in every possible way. You love some characters, you hate some characters. You feel as if you’ve gained and  lost your family and friends among these pages.

As the story flips back and forth between the two storylines, they are eventually brought together but it is not the nice, neat, and happy merge that you’re hoping for. This book has literally left me wondering how I should feel about it’s ending and I don’t mean that in a bad way. I love the fact that this ending has made me feel that way. I don’t know if I want to feel hopeful or if I just want to break down in tears.

This book shows you the horrors and hopes that people experienced during this time and what the consequences were of losing yourself, putting yourself at risk, and living life freely. There was so much reckless behavior, broken relationships, and strained friendships. There were some happy and hopeful moments throughout the story but there were moments of pure devastation. Makkai’s style of writing puts you right there with the characters and what they are feeling and experiencing. This book is very eye-opening to the subject of the AIDS epidemic.

This book has deserved every award it has been nominated for and I wish it had won them all!!

Rating:

5 Stars

Availability:

Available now in hardcover, ebook and audiobook

book review · books · diversity · middle grade · reading

Ghosters 2: Revenge of the Library Ghost by Diana Corbitt {Review}

Blurb:

It’s been a year since Theresa and her English friend, Kerry, won the Ghosters contest. Now her little brother, Joey, has stumbled on a mystery in the school library. Blasts of cold air, lights that flicker, and books flying off the shelves start Joey and his friend, Elbie, searching for the reason. Elbie lives above his family’s mortuary and is very comfortable around the ghosts that troop through its halls.  He’s a prankster and doesn’t mind Joey’s Asperger’s behaviors.  When the boys discover a ghost holding Joey’s bug book hostage, they team up with Theresa and Kelly to decode the ghostly messages found in the titles of the books thrown by the library ghost.

Review:

I thoroughly enjoyed this book! You can’t help but love the friendship between Joey and Elbie. They don’t let Joey’s Asperger’s get in the way of them having fun or getting into a bit of mischief while solving the mystery of their school library and principal. The comfort level they have around the ghosts is admirable as well. I know for myself  I wouldn’t have been that great at handling the special ability to see and communicate with ghosts at their age. This story also involved my love of books and the library. It was refreshing to see Diana incorporate the importance of libraries, books, and reading into her story while keeping it light and fun. You also learn about acceptance and treating people with respect even if they do have a developmental disorder or any other disability for that matter. Elbie’s family living above the mortuary took me back to Vada in My Girl. In fact the friendship between Joey and Elbie reminded me quite a bit of the friendship between Vada and Thomas J.

Although this is a sequel and I had not read the first book, I was still able to follow along and enjoy the story. So you are able to read it as a standalone. Also, the style of writing is perfect for younger readers but not so juvenile that adults can’t enjoy the story.  Now that I have finished it I definitely want to go back and read the first book, Ghosters. I also think that if another book is published for this series, I will have to check it out.

Rating:

4 Stars

Availability:

Available in paperback and ebook

Extra:

I was actually contacted by Diana Corbitt, the author of this book, to see if I would be interested in reading and reviewing it for my blog. I said yes after reading what the book was about and because I have not featured any middle grade books on my blog before.

I will admit that I was very nervous once the book actually arrived because that meant I needed to read it and I haven’t read a middle grade book on my own in I don’t know how long. I usually read middle grade or YA to my children. I was also nervous too because I have never had an author reach out to me directly to review their work. Let me tell you, the pressure was on! After finishing this book, my youngest was excited to get his hands on it, lol. He’d been eyeing it ever since it came in the mail.

Thank you Diana Corbitt for reaching out to me and sending me this awesome story!

adaptation · diversity · Family · movie review · reading

Crazy Rich Asians {Movie review}

I know this isn’t a book review but I felt it is my duty to let you know how I felt about the adaptation of Crazy Rich Asians by Kevin Kwan.

I went to see Crazy Rich Asians tonight. Of course I went to see it because I read the book but even if I hadn’t read the book, I would have wanted to see it. I love a good rom-com. Now, I am a HUUUUGE snob when it comes to adaptations of books. Let’s face the truth, there is so much more in a book than can be put onto the screen.

I loved the fact that the cast was primarily Asian and that Hollywood was not able to “whitewash” it. The casting of the characters was amazing even the slight adjustments they made to some personalities. Gave it a bit of flare.

I knew going in that there were going to be things left out of the movie just because that is unfortunately how it works. The book itself has so much development in it that pushes the plot but the movie was written well enough. I see why Kevin Kwan was so happy with it.

I am curious to see if they will make books two and three of the trilogy into movies. I haven’t read them yet but they have just been bumped up on my TBR.

I definitely want to see this movie again.

It wasn’t perfect(what adaptation is?) but it was well worth it. I highly recommend going to see it. If you’re a reader, I’d read the book first but if you aren’t a reader but you love rom-coms, you’ll definitely enjoy this one.

Here’s to diversity in Hollywood and a very nice adaptation of book to movie!

Rating:

4.5 Stars

Please let me know your thoughts on the movie and/or the book!