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American Dirt by Jeanine Cummins {ARC Review}

Blurb:

Lydia Quixano Perez lives in the Mexican city of Acapulco. She runs a bookstore. She has a son, Luca, the love of her life, and a wonderful husband who is a journalist. And while there are cracks beginning to show in Acapulco because of the drug cartels, her life is, by and large, fairly comfortable.

Even though she knows they’ll never sell, Lydia stocks some of her all-time favorite books in her store. And then one day a man enters the shop to browse and comes up to the register with four books he would like to buy–two of them her favorites. Javier is erudite. He is charming. And, unbeknownst to Lydia, he is the jefe of the newest drug cartel that has gruesomely taken over the city. When Lydia’s husband’s tell-all profile of Javier is published, none of their lives will ever be the same.

American Dirt will leave readers utterly changed. It is a page-turner; it is a literary achievement; it is filled with poignancy, drama, and humanity on every page. It is one of the most important books for our times.

Review:

This was the perfect book to end my reading year of 2019. Such a compelling and heart-wrenching story about a mother and her son fleeing from the home they know and love in order to survive, to a place that won’t openly welcome them but advertises freedom and safety.

This is felt like a non-fiction read although it is fiction. The author puts you in Lydia’s and Luca’s shoes as they trek across Mexico into unknown territory with strangers because that is safer than what awaits them at home. They have lost their entire family and basically have nothing else to lose.  The people they meet along this journey will make you realize that people trying to make their way into this country aren’t always what the media makes them out to be. And some are even worse. You begin to question yourself about what you would do or risk in order to find solace and safety. The risk of losing your life while trying to save it. Losing it physically, emotionally, and mentally. They don’t know who to trust and they really don’t know where they are going. They only know that they don’t want to go back to where they were.

I think this was an important story to be told. You can tell the author took great care in researching and presenting this story. This is one of the few books that I actually read the author’s note after finishing the and I highly recommend others doing so.

Rating:

5 Stars

Availability:

Available in hardcover, ebook, and audiobook January 21, 2020

 

A very special thank you to Flatiron Books for my gifted copy.

addiction · book review · books · Family · Historical fiction · Literary Fiction · love · own voices review · reading · secrets

In West Mills by De’Shawn Charles Winslow {Review}

Blurb:

Azalea “Knot” Centre is determined to live life as she pleases. Let the people of West Mills say what they will; the neighbors’ gossip won’t keep Knot from what she loves best: cheap moonshine, nineteenth-century literature, and the company of men. And yet, Knot is starting to learn that her freedom comes at a high price. Alone in her one-room shack, ostracized from her relatives and cut off from her hometown, Knot turns to her neighbor, Otis Lee Loving, in search of some semblance of family and home.

Otis Lee is eager to help. A lifelong fixer, Otis Lee is determined to steer his friends and family away from decisions that will cause them heartache and ridicule. After his failed attempt as a teenager to help his older sister, Otis Lee discovers a possible path to redemption in the chaos Knot brings to his doorstep. But while he’s busy trying to fix Knot’s life, Otis Lee finds himself powerless to repair the many troubles within his own family, as the long-buried secrets of his troubled past begin to come to light.

Set in an African American community in rural North Carolina from 1941 to 1987, In West Mills is a magnificent, big-hearted small-town story about family, friendship, storytelling, and the redemptive power of love.

Review:

I knew I was going to love this book when I read the synopsis. I related to this story and I felt this story on so many levels. Mr. Winslow tells a story that is all too familiar in the African-American community. Secrets are kept because people honestly believe  it’s the right thing to do when in reality the secrets are more harmful than helpful. All the while, hiding pain and suffering behind alcohol and being closed off from others. Knot is the prime example for all of that. She hides behind a mason jar of liquor, she pushes away the person who loves her so much. She keeps people at bay to avoid being hurt or disappointed and uses the excuse of being independent.

Otis is living in a world that he doesn’t realize is one big lie. A lie that he doesn’t even know exist. Not only a lie about him but his wife holds a secret that affects his dear friend Knot.

Secrets that are kept about true parentage  or other life events are much more detrimental than people realize. So many of the issues are presented in a historical sense but are still relevant today. Keeping secrets such as these can cause one to miss out on so much and when the truth does come out it can cause pain and anger. Knot had one daughter who built a relationship with her and her other daughter didn’t really have much to do with her.

I related to this story so much because I was adopted by a family member but it was a secret that was kept from me until I was 21 years old. My family believed that keeping the secret was better than knowing the truth and it was not the case. Keeping secrets such as these can cause one to miss out on so much and when the truth does come out it can cause pain and anger.

I highly recommend this story. I am so grateful to have been given the opportunity to read and review it. I look forward to Mr. Winslow’s next novel.

Rating:

5 Stars

Availability:

Available now in hardcover, ebook and audiobook

A special thank you to Bloomsbury Publishing for my gifted finished copy of this novel.

 

 

book review · books · child abduction · dedication · Family · Historical fiction · Literary Fiction · Science Ficton · space

Light From Other Stars by Erika Swyler {ARC Review}

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Blurb:

Eleven-year-old Nedda Papas is obsessed with becoming an astronaut. In 1986 in Easter, a small Florida Space Coast town, her dreams seem almost within reach—if she can just grow up fast enough. Theo, the scientist father she idolizes, is consumed by his own obsessions. Laid off from his job at NASA and still reeling from the loss of Nedda’s newborn brother several years before, Theo turns to the dangerous dream of extending his living daughter’s childhood just a little longer. The result is an invention that alters the fabric of time.

Amidst the chaos that erupts, Nedda must confront her father and his secrets, the ramifications of which will irrevocably change her life, her community, and the entire world. But she finds an unexpected ally in Betheen, the mother she’s never quite understood, who surprises Nedda by seeing her more clearly than anyone else.

Decades later, Nedda has achieved her long-held dream, and as she floats in antigravity, far from earth, she and her crewmates face a serious crisis. Nedda may hold the key to the solution, if she can come to terms with her past and the future that awaits her.

Review:

I remember reading and loving Ms. Swyler’s first book, The Book of Speculation so much and have been waiting to see what else she was going to bless us with in a new book. After I read the synopsis for The Light From Other Stars, I knew I wanted to read it. Being able to review it and share my thoughts is a bonus.

When the story opens, we are with grown Nedda who is on a spacecraft in the very near future. When the science terminology started I didn’t think that I would be able to keep up with the story. That was not the case. The scientific terms, although over me head at times, were crucial to the story and to the characteristics of Nedda, both young and older.

The story is told in a duel timeline, grown Nedda in space and younger Nedda in 1986. Nedda is a bright girl who is seen as odd in the eyes of most of the people she comes into contact with. She does have one best friend who loves her for who she is.  His name is Denny. Their friendship is so admirable. Both semi outcasts who love each other for who they are. Even though Nedda is really smart and Denny is just barely making it along, she doesn’t belittle him and he doesnt make fun of her.

Nedda has a very close relationship with her father yet the relationship with her mother is more volatile. Her mother dealt with a great loss while Nedda was younger and their relationship suffered because of it. It is also the same reason Nedda and her father are so close. He was the main parent in her life while her mother dealt with her loss.

Nedda’s father is attempting to work on a machine that will change so much in their lives. Mainly is it something that will help slow down the effects of his arthritis. The pain in his hands are making it harder and harder for him to work. He also as another secret about wanting to get his machine up and running.

Nedda’s mother is a homemaker. She bakes and takes care of the house. The relationship between the parents almost seems as it is of convenience and not love. Further reading and learning about each of them shows this to not be the case,

Nedda’s father miraculously gets his machine working one day but the results are not what he or anyone else expected. There is almost a catastrophic effect. So much is effected in the area around the machine. Unexplained things are happening. Denny and Nedda’s dad are the ones are affected by it the most.

It takes Nedda and her mother to figure out how to make everything right again. During this time, Nedda learns that there is much more to her mother than meets the eye. She is more than just baking sweets. She is very intelligent and knows so much about science. Together they are able to “save the day” but have they saved the day too late?

While grown up Nedda is in space she starts thinking about that fateful day during her childhood and she thinks that she knows what she can do to make living conditions better for her and her spacemates while there are on their journey. Once again Nedda will need her mother’s knowledge In order to complete the job that needs to be done.

Although this novel is categorized under science fiction and historical fiction, I feel that there is some magical realism tied into the story as well.

I am so glad that I did not let the science terminology affect my enjoyment of the book.

Rating:

4.5 Stars

Availability:

Available now in paperback, audio, and ebook.

Thank you, Bloomsbury  Publishing for my review copy of this book.